The Other Mideast War: Saudi/UAE Siege of Hodeidah Fails, Houthis Step Up Attacks Inside the Kingdom

The Other Mideast War: Saudi/UAE Siege of Hodeidah Fails, Houthis Step Up Attacks Inside the Kingdom

With the global media’s eyes will be fixed Monday on the summit between Russian President Vladimir Putin and U.S. President Donald Trump at Helsinki, Finland, Syria is expected to be the main topic of negotiations between the world’s two leading military powers. Israeli media in particular have extensively covered a prospective bargain between Putin and Trump, whereby invited Iranian forces withdraw from Syria in return for the U.S. pulling its troops out of its uninvited and thereby illegal under international law bases east of the Euphrates River. Some Israelis, affiliated with the neocons, having bitterly denounced Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for allegedly placing naive trust in Putin’s word, while foreign policy realists have pointed out the Russian leader cannot make the Iranians leave Syria — even if he wanted to do so.

However, as RogueMoney readers are aware, there is another conflict besides the proxy war with Iran in Syria, that petrodollar linchpin Saudi Arabia has been losing since 2015. This one is much closer to home and therefore more dangerous to the Saudi monarchy than losing influence in the Levant. The defection of a prince from the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to Qatar, Riyadh’s gas-rich Sunni rival, has shined a spotlight on the Emiratis casualties in the Yemen War, and serious dissension inside the Emirates ruling houses regarding the Saudi-led coalition’s quagmire.

Since the Saudis broke off diplomatic relations with Doha in June 2017, Qatar’s Al-Jazeera channel has relentlessly covered the staggering humanitarian costs of the Saudis war on Yemen, as well as the Kingdom’s covered up combat deaths which Western media outlets, fearing expulsion from the country, fail to cover. On Sunday, Putin handed Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani a ceremonial FIFA soccer ball symbolizing Qatar’s 2022 hosting of the World Cup.

Read More

After Turkey's Failed Putsch, Is Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed the Next in Line to Get Coup'd Over the Disastrous War in Yemen?

After Turkey's Failed Putsch, Is Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed the Next in Line to Get Coup'd Over the Disastrous War in Yemen?

Even if we set aside Washington's ongoing pants-ing at the hands of the despotic neo-Ottoman Sultan who accuses the Americans of being behind Friday's coup, or ignore the fact that D.C.'s 'moderate rebel' proxies are being crushed in east Aleppo, there's another turd in the Mideast hummus bowl as the Guerrilla Economist would say: Yemen. Namely, Saudi Arabia's losing war against Saleh loyalist and Houthi tribesmen that has gone beyond a mere debacle to become a potentially existential threat to the continued reign if not survival of certain haughty princes, led by the 31-year-old Mohammad bin Salman Al Saud.

Read More

More Bad News for the (Out)House of Saud: Peace Talks Break Off With Houthis

More Bad News for the (Out)House of Saud: Peace Talks Break Off With Houthis

If the nearly fifteen year old skeletons of 9/11 were the only thing the Saudis had to worry about, that would be one thing. But as V the Guerrilla Economist reported in one of two short podcasts this week, the Saudis are now paying construction firms including the extended bin Ladin clan of supposed 9/11 plotter Osama bin Laden in IOUs. The liquidity crisis in terms of rising Saudi bond yields and higher costs to defend the riyal that many suspected would arrive in 2017 is already here, and the recent modest rebound in oil prices to about $50 a barrel from their late 2015 lows isn't helping much, primarily because Saudi cash burn remains so high...

Read More